Volume 84, Issue 1 e94
PROTOCOL

Generating Bacterial Foods in Toxicology Studies with Caenorhabditis elegans

Tao Ke

Tao Ke

Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York

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Abel Santamaría

Abel Santamaría

Laboratorio de Aminoácidos Excitadores, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía, Mexico City, Mexico

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Alexey A. Tinkov

Alexey A. Tinkov

IM Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Sechenov University, Moscow, Russia

Federal Research Centre of Biological Systems and Agro-technologies of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Orenburg, Russia

Institute of Cellular and Intracellular Symbiosis, Russian Academy of Sciences, Orenburg, Russia

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Julia Bornhorst

Julia Bornhorst

Food Chemistry, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Wuppertal, Wuppertal, Germany

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Michael Aschner

Corresponding Author

Michael Aschner

Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York

IM Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Sechenov University, Moscow, Russia

Corresponding author: [email protected]

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First published: 21 May 2020
Citations: 3

Abstract

Caenorhabditis elegans is a free-living animal that is used as a powerful experimental model in biological sciences. The natural habitat of the animal are areas rich in material from rotting plants or fruits being decomposed by a growing number of microorganisms. The ecology of the natural habitat of C. elegans is a complex interactive network involving many species, including numerous types of bacteria, viruses, fungi, slugs, snails, and isopods, among which bacteria play multifaceted roles in the natural history of C. elegans. Under laboratory conditions, C. elegans is routinely cultured in a petri dish filled with solidified agar and seeded with Escherichia coli strain OP50, the latter offering an alternative model to study the interaction between bacteria and host. Because of the clear advantages of generating specific bacterial foods for mechanistic studies in C. elegans, it is important to develop a robust protocol to generate high-quality bacterial foods commensurate with experimental requirements. Based on previous work by us and others, herein we present a protocol on how to generate these optimal bacterial food–based research tools. © 2020 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Basic Protocol 1: Preparing concentrated E. coli OP50

Basic Protocol 2: Titrating bacteria concentration

Basic Protocol 3: Generating dead bacterial food by heating

Basic Protocol 4: Generating dead bacterial food by antibiotics

Basic Protocol 5: Feeding C. elegans with bacterial foods in liquid